The Green Man v. Robin Hood - fragility, transience, and rebirth

April 09, 2015  •  3 Comments

Loïs Cordelia's latest work in cut-paper features her reinterpretation of an ancient symbol of Nature, the Green Man, combining references also to another ancient 'green man', the legendary archer, outcast, and liberator of the poor and oppressed, Robin Hood. The Green Man looks away from the viewer with a poignant, wistful expression, rather than directly at the viewer with a level gaze, as the Green Man is traditionally depicted.

Gaze of the Green ManGaze of the Green Man"Gaze of the Green Man"
Scalpel paper-cut. Approx. 40 x 50 cm. April 2015.
The Green Man looks away from the viewer with a poignant, wistful expression. The spider's web hints at the fragile interconnectedness of Nature. A dandelion clock implies transience, but also proliferation. A butterfly suggests rebirth.

"Gaze of the Green Man" 
Scalpel paper-cut. Approx. 40 x 50 cm. April 2015.

 

The crown of thorns hints at Christ's suffering, suggesting how biodiversity is destroyed and crucified by humankind. The spider's web hints at the fragile interconnectedness, while numerous native plant species evoke various aspects of Nature. A dandelion clock implies transience, and perhaps the running out of time, but also proliferation. A butterfly suggests rebirth.

 

Work in progress

See Loïs at work on this design in her new video:

Paper Art by a Thousand Scalpel Cuts - Lois CordeliaArtist Loïs Cordelia demonstrates and talks about her scalpel paper-cutting art techniques and inspirations.


Comments

Caroline Mackenzie(non-registered)
Wonderful work and so interesting to see the process. Re-working archetypal symbols in a contemporary context is so important.
Loïs Cordelia
Many thanks for your kind words, Charlotte.

Interesting to hear that you stand up while painting for the same reasons!

I usually cut out of cartridge paper, or pastel paper (circa 150 - 180 gsm). It always amazes me how relatively strong paper is.
charlotte stewart(non-registered)
amazing work Lois! Really nice to see you working. I had wondered if you sat or stood to work- I always stand to paint for the same reason- feeling physically free.
What paper do you cut into? It must be quite tough to hold together in such fine strands and to withstand being lifted and turned.
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