Stephanie Mattner (SternenBlick) interviews Lois Cordelia

April 06, 2016  •  Leave a Comment

Stephanie Mattner of SternenBlick publications (Berlin) interviewed Lois Cordelia about her series of six mixed-media illustrations that feature in SternenBlick's latest anthology of German poetry and prose, Zwischen den Wolken ("Between the Clouds", Mattner, Berlin, 2015).

Lois has recently (March 2016) created a paper-cut design that will feature as the wrap-around front and back covers of a new SternenBlick series, starting in April 2016. Further details to follow.

The title "SternenBlick" is difficult to translate into English. It means something like "View of the Stars", referring to an attitude characterised by optimism and hope, themes which are prevalent in this new anthology.

The full interview is shared below, both in English and in German. 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------

English:

Firstly, many thanks, Stephanie, for inviting me to share my thoughts in an interview – always a pleasure. It's a good exercise for me to stop and think about my work and what it means to me, rather than just to create it, and your questions are always interesting and thought-provoking.

1) Together with SternenBlick-author Marion Hartmann, you are in the process of developing a richly illustrated children's book in verse. In general, how do you get yourself in the mood for each text to be illustrated?

This can be a lengthy process.

For a start, I try to approach each new work from a fresh perspective. Even when it concerns a theme I have previously explored, I like to introduce new ideas and unexpected features. The worst trap for an artist is to become predictable!

When creating illustrations to accompany an existing text, I first read through it a few times and consider any words or phrases that leap out at me. These words are like seeds, dropped into the fertile ground of the imagination. They might be the simplest of adjectives, metaphors, or figures of speech that evoke an image, but given time, they grow and develop in my mind.

At an early stage, I discuss the text with the author or compiler, to make sure I've correctly identified the prevailing themes and emphases. When I've established these semantic threads, I try to 'live' or 'act out' the meaning of each salient feature in some way, through a mixture of intense brainstorming, visualisation, interpretative gestures and dance. Often, I lie on my back in a darkened room for a while, and the pictures begin to come alive in my head. (No wonder I'm a terrible insomniac!) This enables me to step into the poetry, so to speak, and let it come alive within me. I see myself as a medium through which words and imagery flow together to form something meaningful. It's a dynamic process, which only works if I remain flexible enough to accommodate something that is essentially alive: the spirit of the poem.

Marion and I have collaborated on a number of projects in recent years, combining her poetry with my artwork. Sometimes her poetry inspires my artwork, and sometimes it works in reverse, with Marion taking inspiration from a visual piece that I've created. Flexibility is key to creativity. In whichever direction this process develops, the text and images should not only complement each other but expand upon the source. My artwork should do more than simply illustrate the text – it should suggest hidden meanings, alternative interpretations, perhaps even another storyline running in parallel with the actual narrative.

In short, the pictures should inspire the reader to engage imaginatively and creatively with the text, just as I do in “illustrating” it, and consider what it means, on a personal level, or more universally.

Art that is universal and timeless speaks to everyone.

Des Orients Perle (The Orient's Pearl)Des Orients Perle (The Orient's Pearl)Illustration for Szirra's poem Des Orients Perle (The Orient's Pearl), as part of the SternenBlick anthology, Zwischen den Wolken (Between the Clouds) (Mattner, 2016)

Mixed media. November 2015.

 

2) In the case of the new SternenBlick volume, you were able to freely pursue your ideas for the illustrations. How rewarding is this autonomy in the creative process, as regards your imagination?

The freedom to interpret a text visually and creatively in whatever way I wish is a truly rewarding experience. In the case of SternenBlick, I was able to choose the poems and texts that inspired me most, which is a wonderful opportunity in itself.

The only 'problem' is that too many ideas tend to come flooding, especially when the text is abundant in descriptive imagery, and so it can become a bit overwhelming. A lot of deep thought goes into every aspect of the imagery, composition, colour, and so on. Hence, it becomes even more important to simplify and be decisive. Less is more.

I like to combine various mediums in my illustration work, including paper-cutting, painting, drawing, photography, and digital art, though the basic ingredient is cut-paper. My paper-cut designs are often extremely intricate, being cut out of paper using a surgical scalpel, and may take many hours of painstaking work to create. They have characteristically crisp edges that are evocative of lino-cuts and other print-making mediums, linking with many traditional forms of book illustration, including pure silhouette art. I balance the precision of the blade with an energetic freehand sketch which forms the basis of the paper-cut structure, and ensures that the end result is still full of movement and spontaneity.

Choosing which poems to illustrate is an interesting challenge in itself. Some of the SternenBlick poems leapt out at me, and I knew immediately that I wanted to illustrate them. Others required more time and thought. Poems that speak of ambivalence have a special appeal for me, allowing me to explore two sides of the same scenario in my accompanying imagery.

Ikarus (Icarus)Ikarus (Icarus)Icarus

Illustration for Michael Pilath's poem Ikarus, as part of the SternenBlick German anthology, Zwischen den Wolken (Mattner, 2016)

Mixed media. November 2015.

Michael Pilath's poem Ikarus spoke to me particularly. I found it compelling in the way that it evokes the ambiguity of an unresolved love story. The imagined bliss of union with the beloved is set in sharp contrast with the agony of falling back into reality, by alluding to the mythical story of Icarus, who famously flew too near the Sun and fell to his death. Icarus is generally seen as a tragic victim of his own reckless ambition, but on another level he may be seen as one whose heroic passion culminates in a form of divine transformation or transfiguration: like every superstar who dies 'tragically' young in the pursuit of some glittering ecstatic vision that goes beyond the strength of his physical body to sustain, he falls into glory and becomes a legend. In Pilath's poem, our hero picks himself up and re-draws his own wings in thought, in order to soar hopefully upwards anew. In my illustration for the poem, I wanted to depict a dramatic figure caught in motion, torn between agony and ecstasy. My initial free-flowing sketch becomes a crisply defined paper-cut design, in which spikey, scribbled lines suggest intense feeling, yet potential disintegration. Elongated limbs and fingers yearn to stretch beyond the confines of the physical frame.

Michael Pilath's poem Ikarus spoke to me particularly. I found it compelling in the way that it evokes the ambiguity of an unresolved love story. The imagined bliss of union with the beloved is set in sharp contrast with the agony of falling back into reality, by alluding to the mythical story of Icarus, who famously flew too near the Sun and fell to his death. Icarus is generally seen as a tragic victim of his own reckless ambition, but on another level he may be seen as one whose heroic passion culminates in a form of divine transformation or transfiguration: like every superstar who dies 'tragically' young in the pursuit of some glittering ecstatic vision that goes beyond the strength of his physical body to sustain, he falls into glory and becomes a legend. In Pilath's poem, our hero picks himself up and re-draws his own wings in thought, in order to soar hopefully upwards anew. In my illustration for the poem, I wanted to depict a dramatic figure caught in motion, torn between agony and ecstasy. My initial free-flowing sketch becomes a crisply defined paper-cut design, in which spikey, scribbled lines suggest intense feeling, yet potential disintegration. Elongated limbs and fingers yearn to stretch beyond the confines of the physical frame.

Gestrandet (Stranded)Gestrandet (Stranded)Illustration for Sidgrani's poem Gestrandet (Stranded) as part of the SternenBlick anthology, Zwischen den Wolken (Between the Clouds) (Mattner, 2016)

Mixed media. November 2015.

Sidgrani's poem Gestrandet (Stranded) contains a stern warning message to us all, not to let time slip away without fulfilling our dreams. The idea of time being like sand that is blown away in the wind captured my imagination, as it also links poignantly with ecological themes of erosion and Nature's fragile balance. I chose therefore the image of a broken hourglass, from which the sands of time are seen escaping. This is reinforced by the ghost-like outline of a dandelion clock, symbolising ephemerality: the shapes of the seeds separating from the stem of the plant superimposed on the hourglass suggest the fractured lines of broken glass. But the poem also hints at the hope of regeneration. Hence, in my illustration, I include a seedling that sprouts from amidst the sands, helping to hold them together and stopping them flowing away completely. From the ghost of the dandelion clock there also springs a butterfly, symbol of rebirth and transformation.

Sidgrani's poem Gestrandet (Stranded) contains a stern warning message to us all, not to let time slip away without fulfilling our dreams. The idea of time being like sand that is blown away in the wind captured my imagination, as it also links poignantly with ecological themes of erosion and Nature's fragile balance. I chose therefore the image of a broken hourglass, from which the sands of time are seen escaping. This is reinforced by the ghost-like outline of a dandelion clock, symbolising ephemerality: the shapes of the seeds separating from the stem of the plant superimposed on the hourglass suggest the fractured lines of broken glass. But the poem also hints at the hope of regeneration. Hence, in my illustration, I include a seedling that sprouts from amidst the sands, helping to hold them together and stopping them flowing away completely. From the ghost of the dandelion clock there also springs a butterfly, symbol of rebirth and transformation.

Rückzug (Retreat)Rückzug (Retreat)Illustration for Marion Hartmann's poem Rückzug (Retreat) as part of the SternenBlick anthology, Zwischen den Wolken (Between the Clouds) (Mattner, 2016)

Mixed media. November 2015.


Marion Hartmann's poem Rückzug (Retreat) spoke to me on a very personal level, partly because Marion and I have worked closely together on a number of projects, and we seem to have an intuitive understanding of each other's work. This poem of hers moved me, because it describes how creative writing can help her to escape from the prison of self-doubt and reconnect with the things she loves in the world around her. I relate to this completely, through my visual art practice. The imagination is a path to freedom. The female figure and the dog are themselves cut out of the pages of a book, which could be either a writer's notebook or an artist's sketchbook, both used to compile sketches and jottings. The words “ein Stift mit dem Du schreibst” (“a pen with which you write”) climb out of the book, like a plant growing up towards the light of the prison window.

Marion Hartmann's poem Rückzug (Retreat) spoke to me on a very personal level, partly because Marion and I have worked closely together on a number of projects, and we seem to have an intuitive understanding of each other's work. This poem of hers moved me, because it describes how creative writing can help her to escape from the prison of self-doubt and reconnect with the things she loves in the world around her. I relate to this completely, through my visual art practice. The imagination is a path to freedom. The female figure and the dog are themselves cut out of the pages of a book, which could be either a writer's notebook or an artist's sketchbook, both used to compile sketches and jottings. The words “ein Stift mit dem Du schreibst” (“a pen with which you write”) climb out of the book, like a plant growing up towards the light of the prison window.

 

3) How important is it for you overall to communicate with the author/publisher?

I consider it vitally important to communicate effectively with the author or compiler from the start, not only in terms of establishing the prevailing concepts that have inspired the composition of the text and the appropriate themes of imagery that might accompany it, but also, obviously, for keeping track of practical considerations such as the dimensions and format of the page, limitations of the printing process to be used, and deadlines to be met.

Since 1999, when I was finishing high school, I have worked as a part time studio assistant to children's illustrator Jan Pienkowski (born 1936, Warsaw). This has made me extremely conscious of some of the challenges that arise in the context of dealing with large scale publishing organisations!

 

4) In your opinion, what is the most important characteristic that one should have as an illustrator?

Primarily, of course, the most important job of an illustrator is to draw us into the world of the story. The visual imagery must inspire and intrigue, sometimes uplift, sometimes disturb the viewer. It must produce a reaction.

But more than this, the illustrator must go beyond the text. That is to say, not simply to illustrate what is already told in the story, but to suggest parallel narratives and hidden meanings, and to encourage the viewer to think more deeply about the messages of the text and pictures.



5) We are delighted that you have already offered to assist with the creation of the third volume. What are your motives for supporting our project?

I love the themes that inspire the SternenBlick collection and its uplifting messages for our world. This seems enough reason in itself to support the project.

For me personally, every new project is also a fresh challenge, something to spur me onwards and upwards, and so it is a journey of exploration and self discovery, exploring the landscape of my own soul – this I consider more valuable than anything else, because it furthers my artistic development and strengthens my artistic voice.

Art should not stick to the familiar, but should be the record of a struggle with the unfamiliar, questioning conventions, not necessarily finding the answers, not necessarily resolved, but deepening our search within ourselves. As Thomas Merton once wrote: “Art enables us to find ourselves and lose ourselves at the same time."

 

 

Lois Cordelia, Ipswich, UK, March 2016

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Deutsch:

Erst einmal herzlichen Dank, Stephanie, dass Du mich einludst, gegenseitige Gedanken in einem Interview auszutauschen – so etwas ist immer hoechst erfreulich. Fuer mich ist es eine gute Gelegenheit, nachzudenken ueber meine Arbeit und das, was ich darin erreichen moechte. Es ist sinnvoller als immer nur Neues zu schaffen, und Deine Fragen sind immer herausfordernd und interessant.

1) Mit SternenBlick-Autorin Marion Hartmann entwickelst du ein reich illustriertes Kinderbuch in Versen. Wie stimmst du dich im allgemeinen ein, auf den jeweils zu illustrierenden Text?

Es kann lange dauern.

Jedes neue Thema versuche ich aus einer bestimmten Perspektive zu beginnen. Selbst, wenn es ein Thema ist, welches ich bereits benutzte. Ich moechte neue Ideen hineinbringen und Unerwartetes hinzufuegen. Das Schlimmste, was einem Kuenstler passieren kann, ist Erwartetes.

Bevor ich Illustrationen schaffen kann fuer einen Text, muss ich mich durch vielfaches Lesen voellig vertraut machen. Wichtig sind Woerter oder Ausdruecke, die mich direkt ansprechen quasi anspringen. Sie sind dann wie Samen, welche auf den fruchtbaren Boden der Vorstellungskraft gefallen sind. Es koennen einfache Adjektive, Metaphern, Redewoerter sein, welche ein Bild erzeugen, aber allmaehlich wachsen sie und bilden sich in meinen Gedanken weiter.

Sehr frueh unterhalte ich mich mit dem Author oder dem Compiler, um genau zu wissen, dass ich alle relevanten Themen und nachdruecklichen Bedeutungen erkannt habe. Wenn dies geschehen ist, bemuehe ich mich, die Bedeutung jeder wichtigen Aussage nachzuvollziehen durch eine Mischung von geistiger Bewaeltigung, Visualitaet, interpretativer Gestik und Tanz zu erreichen. Oft lege ich mich im abgedunkelten Raum hin und schon entstehen mir Bilder vor den Augen. (Es zeigt auch, warum ich schlecht schlafen kann!) So steige ich in Poesie ein, damit ich es lebendig in mir erlebe. Ich sehe mich als ein Medium, durch das Wort und Bild fliesst, um Bedeutung zu gewinnen. Es ist ein dynamischer Vorgang, welcher nur dann gelingen kann, wenn ich offen bin fuer das Lebendige, naemlich den Geist der Poesie.

Marion und ich haben im Laufe mehrerer Jahre an verschiedenen Projekten gearbeitet, bei denen ihre Poesie und meine Kunst integriert wurden. Manchmal inspiriert ihre Poesie mein kuenstlerisches Schaffen und manchmal passiert es anders herum, indem Marion eine Inspiration durch eines meiner Bilder erhaelt. Flexibilitaet ist der Schluessel der Kreativitaet. In welcher Form auch immer sich der Schaffungsprozess entwickelt, Wort und Bild sollten sich nicht nur ergaenzen, sondern ueber das Urspruengliche hinausgehen. Meine Kunst sollte mehr sein als Illustration eines Textes – es sollte auf versteckte Deutungen hinweisen, eine anderslaeufige Interpretation bieten, vielleicht sogar eine anders laufende Geschichte parallel-laufen lassen. Kurz gesagt, das Bild sollte den Leser inspirieren, sich bildlich einzufuegen und kreativ den Text zu erleben, genau wie es mir geht, wenn ich es erschaffe, entweder aus persoenlicher Sicht oder allgemeiner.

Kunst, die universal und zeitlos ist, spricht Jeden an.



2) Beim neuen SternenBlick-Band konntest du frei deinen Ideen für die Illustrationen folgen. Wie gewinnbringend ist diese Autonomie im Entstehungsprozess bzw. für deine Phantasie?

Die Moeglichkeit, einen Text bildlich und kreativ zu interpretieren, ohne jede Vorgabe, ist ein wirklich grosses Erlebnis. Im Bezug auf SternenBlick konnte ich mir Gedichte und Texte auswaehlen, die mich sofort inspirierten. Das ist eine selten schoene Gelegenheit.

Mein einziges Problem ist die Flut von Ideen, besonders wenn der Text reich an beschreibender Metaphorik ist: das kann dann ueberwaeltigend sein. Ich mache mir viele Gedanken ueber jeden Aspekt von Metaphorik, Komposition, Farbe und Anderes. Deshalb muss ich vereinfachen und sehr genau sein. Wenig bedeutet dann mehr.

Ich mag gern verschiedene Medien in meinen Werken kombinieren: Papierschnitt, Malerei, Zeichnung, Photographie und Digitales, aber das Gewicht liegt auf Papierschnitt. Meine Entwuerfe sind aeusserst komlipiziert. Ich benutze ein chirurgisches Skalpell, und meine Entwuerfe koennen Stunden dauern. Sie haben ausgepraegte Kannten. Wie bei Linolschnitt und anderen Drucktechniken erinnern sie auch an traditionelle Buch-Illustrationen, einschliesslich der Silhouettenkunst. Die Schaerfe der Schneide balanciert meine Freihand-Skizze aus, welche die Basis meines Schnittes so bildet, sodass das Resultat noch voller Bewegung und Spontanitaet bleibt.

Die Wahl, welches Gedicht sich am besten eignet, ist herausfordernd. Bei einigen der Gedichte des SternenBlick Buches, wusste ich sofort, dass ich sie gern illustrieren wollte. Bei anderen Gedichten muste ich laenger verweilen, sie mehr hinterfragen. Gedichte mit Ambivalenz liegen mir sehr, da ich dann beide Seiten des Themas in meinen Entwurf uebernehmen kann.

Michael Pilaths Gedicht Ikarus war ein solcher Fall. Ich fand es war fuer mich herausfordernd, die angedeutete Liebesgeschichte einzufuegen. Das vorgestellte, erahnte Glueck des Einsseins mit dem Geliebten steht in scharfem Widerspruch zur Rueckkehr in die Realitaet, zur Einbeziehung des Ikarus Falles. Ikarus wird allgemein als tragisches Opfer seiner heroischen Leidenschaft angesehen, welche in goettlicher Transformation und Transfiguration gipfelt. Es ist wie der Tod eines Superstars, der auf tragische Weise als junger Mensch stirbt, auf der Suche nach einer glaenzenden Karriere oder Vision, welche die Grenzen seines koerperlichen und seelischen Seins sprengt: so faellt er in seinen Nachruhm und wird zur Legende. In Pilaths Gedicht ist es der Held selbst, der seine Fluegel neu schafft, voller Gedanken, dass er erneut himmelwaerts fliegen wird. In meiner Illustration wollte ich die dramatische Situation in Bewegung festhalten, gefangen zwischen Schmerz und Ekstase. Meine fliessende Skizze wurde so zum genauen Design, in dem scharf angedeutete Linien die intensiven Gefuehle ausdruecken, aber auch ihre moegliche Zerstoerung. Langgezogene Glieder und uebergrosse Finger draengen danach, die physischen Grenzen zu ueberschreiten.

Sidgranis Gedicht Gestrandet ist eine grosse warnende Botschaft, unsere Lebenszeit nicht zu vergeuden, ohne unsere Traeume gelebt zu haben: der Gedanke, Zeit sei wie Sand, der vom Wind verweht wird. Mir wurde offensichtliche Erosion und die leicht zerstoerbare Balance in der Natur bewusst. Deshalb nahm ich das zerbrochene Stundenglas, angedeutet durch Risse im beschaedigten Glas, staendig weiteren Sand entlassend. Das wird auch deutlich in der geisterhaften Loewenzahn-Uhr, als Symbol fuer Kurzlebigkeit. Die Samen haben sich geloest und erscheinen auf dem Stundenglas als zerbrochenes Glas. Doch das Gedicht spricht auch von hoffnungsvoller Regeneration. Deshalb nahm ich einen Samen, der mitten im Sand zum Sproessling waechst, der die Samen zusammenhaelt und so verhindert, dass sie in alle Winde zerstreut werden. Ausserdem hat die Loewenzahn-Uhr einen Schmetterling, das Symbol fuer Wiedergeburt und Transfomation.

Marion Hartmanns Gedicht Rueckzug sprach mich ganz persoenlich an, teils weil Marion und ich eng zusammen-gearbeitet haben an verschiedenen Projekten und weil wir ein intutives Verstaendnis fuer unser gegenseitiges Werk haben. Dieses Gedicht beruehrte mich stark, weil es mir zeigte, wie befreiend kreatives Schaffen fuer sie sein kann, erloesend von Selbstzweifel und, wie hilfreich Kreativitaet fuer sie ist in der Rueckbindung an die geliebte Welt um sie herum. Das geht mir selbst nahe durch mein bildnerisches Gestalten. Vorstellungskraft, Imagination ist der Weg in die Freiheit. Die weibliche Figur und der Hund wurden aus Buchseiten geschnitten. Sie koennten aus einem Notizbuch der Dichterin stammen, oder aus dem Skizzenbuch eines Bildenden Kuenstlers. Beide leben von Notizen und Skizzen. Der Satz, "ein Stift, mit dem du schreibst" steigt aus den Buchseiten und waechst dem Licht der Zellenwand entgegen.


3) Wie wichtig ist für dich die Kommunikation mit dem Autor/Herausgeber ganz allgemein?

Es ist sehr notwendig, oefter in Verbindung zu sein von Anfang an, nicht nur um auf Vorliegendes einzugehen im Zusammenhang von Text und naheliegenden Themen der Vorstellungsktaft, die mich und sie begleiten koennten, sondern ebenso wichtig als praktische Ueberlegungen ueber Dimensionen, das Format der Seiten, Grenzen des Druckens und Zeitgebung fuer das Projekt.

Seit 1999, als ich noch in der Hochschule war, war ich Teilzeit Studio-Assistentin fuer den Kinderbuch Autor, Jan Pienkowski (1936 in Warschau geboren). Dadurch wurden mir die Probleme und Forderungen im Zusammenang mit Verlegern grosser Buecher-Mengen sehr deutlich!

4) Was ist deiner Meinung nach die wichtigste Eigenschaft, die man als Illustrator mitbringen sollte?

Das Wichtigste waere das Vermoegen, Leser in die Welt der Illustration zu locken. Das visuelle Darstellen muss inspirieren, es muss manchmal aufregen, anregen, oder auch mal bestuerzend wirken. Eine Reaktion waere erwuenscht.

Der Illustrator sollte ueber den Text hinausgehen. Das bedeutet nicht, nur bildlich darzustellen, was in der Geschichte passierte, sondern eine Alternative zu bieten, versteckte Dinge zu zeigen und den Leser anzuregen, tiefer ueber das Gelesene nachzudenken in Wort und Text.
 

 

5) Wir freuen uns außerordentlich, dass du dich bereits sogar für den 3. Band unserer Anthologie zur Gestaltung des Bandes angeboten hast. Was sind deine Beweggründe unser Projekt zu unterstützen?

Mir gefallen die Themen, welche in der SternenBlick Sammlung deutlich wurden. Es sind aufbauende Botschaften fuer unsere Welt. Das sind Gruende genug, dieses Projekt zu unterstuetzen.

Persoenlich gesprochen bedeutet jedes neue Projekt eine Herausforderung, etwas, was mich voranbringt und somit ist es eine Reise von Entdeckung, Selbstfindung, dem Erforschen meiner Seelenlage. Das ist fuer mich wertvoller als alles Andere. Es staerkt meine Entwicklung und Ausdruckskraft als Kuenstler.

Kunst sollte nicht im Konventionellen stecken-bleiben, es sollte das Streben in Unbekanntes enthalten, in Frage stellen, es braucht keine definitiven Antworten zu finden. So wie Thomas Merton schrieb: “Kunst befaehigt uns, unser Selbst zu finden und uns gleichzeitig gehen-zu-lassen.”

 

Lois Cordelia, Ipswich, England, GB, Maerz 2016

 

http://www.sternenblick.org/2016/03/11/wie-eine-anthologie-entsteht/​


Comments

No comments posted.
Loading...

Archive